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February 17, 2021 1:16 pm  #2


Re: Limbaugh is dead

Imagine having to watch Fox News.

 

February 17, 2021 1:18 pm  #3


Re: Limbaugh is dead

RIP
The good always die young.

 

February 17, 2021 1:23 pm  #4


Re: Limbaugh is dead

Some lies don't die young enough.

 

February 17, 2021 1:30 pm  #5


Re: Limbaugh is dead

Rush Limbaugh and Howard Stern shared the same birthday, Jan 12.

 

February 17, 2021 2:23 pm  #7


Re: Limbaugh is dead

Not the first conservative broadcaster but certainly the first to take advantage of the demise of the FCC's "Fairness Doctrine" and father of modern opinion-driven, fact-free talk radio and TV cum propaganda. 

 

February 17, 2021 2:27 pm  #8


Re: Limbaugh is dead

I'm proud of how restrained we all are.
 

 

February 17, 2021 2:37 pm  #9


Re: Limbaugh is dead

He brought so much value to shareholders.

 

February 17, 2021 3:11 pm  #10


Re: Limbaugh is dead


 

February 17, 2021 3:12 pm  #11


Re: Limbaugh is dead

He was the modern day Father Coughlin. 

 

February 17, 2021 3:40 pm  #12


Re: Limbaugh is dead

His program was an endless stream of commercials interrupted by bombastic drivel. Sadly it demonstrated the decline
of American commercial AM radio. In years gone by, it was always exciting to scan the AM dial especially at night
and discover great music or interesting talk but nowadays except for stations like Chicago's WGN or public radio,
it is all syndicated rubbish.

 

 

February 17, 2021 4:19 pm  #13


Re: Limbaugh is dead

I believe Rush Limbaugh once said something along the lines of feminism was created by less attractive women so they could have a place in pop culture. Which sounds like an unfunny riff on a George Carlin bit.

Larry King, now Limbaugh. They used their voices, brains (as such re RL) and influential reach in very different ways.

 

February 17, 2021 4:25 pm  #14


Re: Limbaugh is dead

Once upon a time, during seemingly fairer days, radio and TV in the US was governed to show both sides equally. Then the repeal of the Fairness Doctrine in 1984 took place. 

Since then ........

 

February 17, 2021 4:31 pm  #15


Re: Limbaugh is dead

I was not a fan of Rush Limbaugh - personally, I couldn't stand the guy and I never listened to his radio or TV show. (Remember the ill-fated TV effort?)

But as odious as his opinions could be, he does deserve praise for one thing. More than almost anyone else, he pioneered the modern nationwide talk show, an effort that - for better or worse - helped save a lot of AM stations and kept them alive as FM took over the industry.

I'm not sure who will replace him on the hundreds of stations that carry (carried?) his show. I tuned in to WBEN this afternoon, and they were airing a tribute to Rush, featuring highlights of some of his shows. That's good for today. What they do the rest of the week and from here on in is another question. Is there an heir apparent? Did Limbaugh pick a replacement for himself? Expect more news on that to come. 

By the way - and this may surprise some here - the late, great Mark Dailey was a huge fan of Rush Limbaugh, and thought he was a terrific talent. He talked about him all the time. And Dailey was one of the nicest people I've ever met in the industry. For whatever that's worth. 

 

February 17, 2021 4:34 pm  #16


Re: Limbaugh is dead

Will there be a high profile person to replace him, or does Sean Hannity gain listeners?

 

February 17, 2021 5:15 pm  #17


Re: Limbaugh is dead

Here's what's currently on his home page. You mean there were three of him? 

https://i.ibb.co/tJdPZ5M/rush.jpg

 

February 17, 2021 5:30 pm  #18


Re: Limbaugh is dead

IIRC he comes from a long line of southern Confederate-types. He didn't just pick up his racist attitudes randomly.

 

February 17, 2021 6:13 pm  #19


Re: Limbaugh is dead

In regards to "saving" AM radio, I think he sort of did at the time in that AM didn't know where to go after FM took over for music, and he came upon a formula that worked at the time, but he did long-term damage, as every NewsTalk station in the US became 24/7 Rush and Rush imitators. American AM radio really spun themselves into niche territory -- to the point where the term "AM Radio" kind of became an insulting colloquialism. 

That damage lasted, with big stations like KABC, KGO, and WABC on life-support.

Meanwhile, Canadian AM NewsTalk never went fully in that direction, stayed more inclusive and full-service, and as a result, our equivalents like CFRB, CFRA, CJOB or CKNW are in much better relative shape.

Last edited by RadioAaron (February 17, 2021 6:15 pm)


 
 

February 17, 2021 7:09 pm  #20


Re: Limbaugh is dead

RadioAaron wrote:

In regards to "saving" AM radio, I think he sort of did at the time in that AM didn't know where to go after FM took over for music, and he came upon a formula that worked at the time, but he did long-term damage, as every NewsTalk station in the US became 24/7 Rush and Rush imitators. American AM radio really spun themselves into niche territory -- to the point where the term "AM Radio" kind of became an insulting colloquialism. 

That damage lasted, with big stations like KABC, KGO, and WABC on life-support.

Meanwhile, Canadian AM NewsTalk never went fully in that direction, stayed more inclusive and full-service, and as a result, our equivalents like CFRB, CFRA, CJOB or CKNW are in much better relative shape.

Having to compete with highly successful local CBC Radio stations in the big markets probably also has had some impact on Canadian news/talk on AM. Although CBC isn't associated with the AM band in Ontario or Quebec anymore, it is still on AM throughout Western Canada (with FM repeaters of varying coverage)

NPR doesn't factor into the ratings as much in the US as CBC does in Canada, though there are some exceptions in markets like New York and Seattle.

Last edited by MJ Vancouver (February 17, 2021 7:14 pm)

 

February 17, 2021 7:10 pm  #21


Re: Limbaugh is dead

Limbaugh is given way too much credit for somehow helping to save AM radio in the US.  He actually sped up it's death.  His successful three hour syndicated show produced other similar shout fest themed  talk programs most of them syndicated or regional.  These shows were carried on thousands of AM stations.

This in the late 80's was the beginning of the end of local AM radio in America. The  loud, brash, at times bigoted and biased comments made AM radio seem even more low brow and inferior.  We can debate about his content and actual talent, but to give him credit for saving AM or talk radio... no way.   AM,  with the exception of some major and medium market stations is on it's last legs.

The only thing "saving" or prolonging many AM radio stations stateside are the so called "translators" that allow low power FM frequencies.  So they get to extend their reach on the FM band, but often need two or three frequencies just to cover the city.  A very inefficient system and just further jamming up the local FM dial so an AM station can hopefully hang on.

Rush's style of syndicated talk radio actually sped up the demise of thousands of AM stations stateside over the decades.  And even some larger AM stations have essentially no staff other than some technical, and have been on automation for years.

 

February 17, 2021 7:34 pm  #22


Re: Limbaugh is dead

paterson1 wrote:

Limbaugh is given way too much credit for somehow helping to save AM radio in the US.  He actually sped up it's death.  His successful three hour syndicated show produced other similar shout fest themed  talk programs most of them syndicated or regional.  These shows were carried on thousands of AM stations.

This in the late 80's was the beginning of the end of local AM radio in America. The  loud, brash, at times bigoted and biased comments made AM radio seem even more low brow and inferior.  We can debate about his content and actual talent, but to give him credit for saving AM or talk radio... no way.   AM,  with the exception of some major and medium market stations is on it's last legs.

The only thing "saving" or prolonging many AM radio stations stateside are the so called "translators" that allow low power FM frequencies.  So they get to extend their reach on the FM band, but often need two or three frequencies just to cover the city.  A very inefficient system and just further jamming up the local FM dial so an AM station can hopefully hang on.

Rush's style of syndicated talk radio actually sped up the demise of thousands of AM stations stateside over the decades.  And even some larger AM stations have essentially no staff other than some technical, and have been on automation for years.

That's what I was trying to say, but much better put. It worked for a bit, but it poisoned the well.
 


 
 

February 17, 2021 7:40 pm  #23


Re: Limbaugh is dead

MJ Vancouver wrote:

RadioAaron wrote:

In regards to "saving" AM radio, I think he sort of did at the time in that AM didn't know where to go after FM took over for music, and he came upon a formula that worked at the time, but he did long-term damage, as every NewsTalk station in the US became 24/7 Rush and Rush imitators. American AM radio really spun themselves into niche territory -- to the point where the term "AM Radio" kind of became an insulting colloquialism. 

That damage lasted, with big stations like KABC, KGO, and WABC on life-support.

Meanwhile, Canadian AM NewsTalk never went fully in that direction, stayed more inclusive and full-service, and as a result, our equivalents like CFRB, CFRA, CJOB or CKNW are in much better relative shape.

Having to compete with highly successful local CBC Radio stations in the big markets probably also has had some impact on Canadian news/talk on AM. Although CBC isn't associated with the AM band in Ontario or Quebec anymore, it is still on AM throughout Western Canada (with FM repeaters of varying coverage)

NPR doesn't factor into the ratings as much in the US as CBC does in Canada, though there are some exceptions in markets like New York and Seattle.

NPR and CBC have similar success, in my opinion. They both have markets where they're top tier, and both have markets where the audience is small.

CBC has Toronto, Ottawa, Halifax, and Vancouver, but has low listenership in the Prairies and Quebec. NPR is a top performer in similar American markets like Seattle, San Fran, Washington, Austin, and even unexpected places like Raleigh, North Carolina.

But I think you're right -- NPR's success is more recent, and CBC's presence may have prevented Canadian N/T from going all-in with the All-Limbaugh format.

Last edited by RadioAaron (February 17, 2021 7:43 pm)


 
 

February 17, 2021 7:49 pm  #24


Re: Limbaugh is dead

I had read that his show was so widespread primarily because it was cheap - stations could pay bargain-basement prices to carry it. Less a coveted gem and more a Franklin Mint Faberge egg.

 

February 17, 2021 8:03 pm  #25


Re: Limbaugh is dead

RadioActive wrote:

Here's what's currently on his home page. You mean there were three of him? 

https://i.ibb.co/tJdPZ5M/rush.jpg

Ah, so this is like the Three Jokers concept DC Comics floated recently.

 

February 17, 2021 8:06 pm  #26


Re: Limbaugh is dead

Chrisphen wrote:

I had read that his show was so widespread primarily because it was cheap - stations could pay bargain-basement prices to carry it. Less a coveted gem and more a Franklin Mint Faberge egg.

Not just cheap; free. All you have to give up is some ad time for the national spots.


 
 

February 17, 2021 8:07 pm  #27


Re: Limbaugh is dead

Chrisphen wrote:

I had read that his show was so widespread primarily because it was cheap - stations could pay bargain-basement prices to carry it. Less a coveted gem and more a Franklin Mint Faberge egg.

https://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/03/business/media/03radio.html

 

February 17, 2021 9:39 pm  #28


Re: Limbaugh is dead

Limbaugh saved AM radio just like reality TV saved TV. Limbaugh needed radio more than radio needed him. Radio would have done much better without him.

 

February 17, 2021 11:26 pm  #29


Re: Limbaugh is dead

On Limbaugh's death: I found his opinions nauseating for reasons well expressed above but don't relish cancer as the cause of his silence. Human reason would be much more satisfying.  Death and illness cross the political spectrum, strike those who lie as well as those who speak truthfully, and rub out the wealthy and the poor (acknowledging the nuance of money buying 'get out of jail free' cards).

On any role Limbaugh played in saving AM radio: A reality check — we're radiophiles. Good on us for that. But pause and realize that AM radio (and FM, and VHF and UHF TV, and shortwave and longwave) serve largely as content delivery vehicles as well as artist's canvas. Think of AM radio as a dot on a massive technological continuum. We uttered our first grunts after capturing a wooly mammoth, then language development enabled articulated storytelling around the campfire. Evolution saw us through Courtly entertainment, the Shakespearean stage, and Speaker's Corner. Marconi and Fessenden came along, spun their magic, and radio was born, giving rise to new avenues for mass communication. Now, Limbaugh's microscopic window has closed even as the curtain inevitably falls on AM radio. In very short time, when we bid adieu to FM, and as technological delivery methods and means continue to change, we'll still tell stories, create music, go on rants, issue fake news and other propaganda, and make all manner of audio (and audio-visual, multi-sensory) mayhem.

Rush Limbaugh was a giant for a blip of a second, a rock star in our time, but our time is as fleeting as the present almost always is. Major influencer leading up to Trump, and a cornerstone of politics from the 1980s through at least the early-mid 2020s, Limbaugh will likely make it into mass communication and US history textbooks, though in mostly a symbolic, anecdotal way.

Did Limbaugh drag out AM radio? Arguably. Perhaps. But for such a short time that it'll be a footnote in history even if it seemed massive to us as witnesses and participants in 'the moment’. AM radio will join the passenger pigeon as an extinct means of communication. Efficient in its time, but quickly a curiosity in the antique shop, its demise is inevitable. What matters, on the other hand, is content. As we head into the future, we'll do well to pay focused attention to the quality of the goods we deliver and not worry so much about whether the goods travel on an old Edsel or over Starlink. Starlink, too, will soon fade. What’s needed is dexterity — our ability to adapt our contribution to whatever delivery vehicle might be available at any point along the technological continuum. We’ll need to recognize new opportunities such as increasing degrees of global reach, low-cost and high-quality basement production, avenues for cross-platform delivery, ease of popular access to the means of production. And assorted impediments, as well.

Some key lessons from Limbaugh’s 70 year stint on Earth? Communicate what is (to the speaker) meaningful, true and worthy; understand impediments to content quality; embrace diversity in ideas and thought; make space for repugnant ideas but burst bubbles; and nurture and promote healthy and constructive disagreement.

Limbaugh's death leaves me with perhaps one overriding thought. Brashly one-sided political storytelling has been significantly enabled by the elimination, under Ronald Reagan, of the Fairness Doctrine. This has had serious consequences on discourse not only in the US but beyond. Do we need a new or renewed Fairness Doctrine? If we don't want state-imposed rules imposing such a Doctrine, can industry accomplish thoughtful balance on its own, without a required mandate? Should market forces, which are truly not democratically controlled, be acceptable as a major if not overarching determinant of political influence and direction in a democracy?
 

Last edited by Saul (February 17, 2021 11:41 pm)

 

February 17, 2021 11:52 pm  #30


Re: Limbaugh is dead

67GreenRambler wrote:

Chrisphen wrote:

I had read that his show was so widespread primarily because it was cheap - stations could pay bargain-basement prices to carry it. Less a coveted gem and more a Franklin Mint Faberge egg.

https://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/03/business/media/03radio.html

Yes, it wasn't cheap to for his syndicator. He was obviously paid millions. It was cheap for affiliates as the money was made from the national ads in the show. That's how it got some many affiliates: basically free, popular programming.