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June 10, 2021 8:12 pm  #1


When CHUM Turned To Rock But Refused To Play It

I borrowed the image below from a great Facebook site called "I Loved AM Radio." It appears to be an ad for CHUM sometime in the late 50s when Harvey Dobbs was still on the air. What's interesting about it is one line in the copy: "No Rock And Roll."

This show apparently only aired during what was once euphemistically called "Housewife Time," from 10 - 11:30AM, when the kids were at school and dad went to work, leaving mom alone at home with the radio. I never realized the station that made its name as the first rock and roll station in Canada and one of the pioneers in North America carved out a time every day when rock got rolled right off the air! (And who wouldn't want 90 minutes with no "irritation potential?" If this, indeed, is from a time after the shift to rock, that's pretty insulting to the rest of their regular programming!) 

https://i.ibb.co/TTCy6X0/dobbs.jpg

 

June 10, 2021 9:36 pm  #2


Re: When CHUM Turned To Rock But Refused To Play It

According to the CHUM Tribute Site, Harvey Dobbs was on air from 1949 to 1959 in the Midday shift mentioned in the ad.

 

June 10, 2021 9:45 pm  #3


Re: When CHUM Turned To Rock But Refused To Play It

Anyone who listened to CHUM in the early 1960's knows that the 'Housewives DJ' John Spragge played much softer songs on his show from 9 'til noon.  Many so called 'rock and roll stations' in Canada and the U.S. were much softer in the daytime and rocked harder later in the day and night when the kids were out of school..I believe this ad was pre 1957.
 

Last edited by Doug Thompson (June 10, 2021 9:46 pm)

 

June 10, 2021 9:53 pm  #4


Re: When CHUM Turned To Rock But Refused To Play It

Doug Thompson wrote:

I believe this ad was pre 1957. 

Which just makes the No Rock N Roll promise that much more ironic, considering what was to come. 

     Thread Starter
 

June 10, 2021 10:58 pm  #5


Re: When CHUM Turned To Rock But Refused To Play It

RadioActive wrote:

Doug Thompson wrote:

I believe this ad was pre 1957. 

Which just makes the No Rock N Roll promise that much more ironic, considering what was to come. 

So did CFRB pick up the show shortly after? (or anyone else?)


RadioWiz & RadioQuiz are NOT the same person. 
RadioWiz & THE Wiz are NOT the same person.
 
 

June 10, 2021 11:31 pm  #6


Re: When CHUM Turned To Rock But Refused To Play It

Actually Harvey was at CFRB before he came to CHUM.  Harvey remained on air at CHUM until 1959 when he went into CHUM sales and was replaced on air by John Spragge.  Harvey was always a top salesman.  He stayed at CHUM until he retired.  Harvey fought hard against the change in format and if you listen to his aircheck at rockradioscrapbook, you'll hear him still play big bands and other songs that definitely didn't fit the sound of the 'New CHUM'.  I worked with Harvey when I became Production Manager of CHUM AM & FM. Interesting guy.  

 

June 11, 2021 7:47 am  #7


Re: When CHUM Turned To Rock But Refused To Play It

Doug Thompson wrote:

Anyone who listened to CHUM in the early 1960's knows that the 'Housewives DJ' John Spragge played much softer songs on his show from 9 'til noon.  Many so called 'rock and roll stations' in Canada and the U.S. were much softer in the daytime and rocked harder later in the day and night when the kids were out of school..I believe this ad was pre 1957.
 

Good points Doug.  If you look at the early top 50 charts from CHUM there was lots of MOR, even some country   songs and instrumentals on the playlist.  Rock and roll was new and there was still a lot of very popular non rock and roll that would be in the top 50.  And mid morning perfectly logical that CHUM would program to the audience that was listening in the mid to late 50's, and that would be mostly adults and housewives since the kids were at school.  The advertising during this timeslot would be geared for the housewife at home too.  One of the many reasons why CHUM was so successful.