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July 4, 2022 3:24 pm  #1


The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

This article fascinated me because of the topic - the increasing lack of an AM radio option in modern electric vehicles. I get why there's so much interference. But I'm not 100% sure there's nothing they can do about it with a little more research. I have to admit I'm one of those people who would balk at buying a battery-operated car solely for the fact there's no AM. 

Which, I suppose means I'll be hanging on to my gas guzzler as long as possible.

The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio 

They really need to solve this or at least present another option as a standard feature. The scribe below, one of my favourite radio writers in California, argues AM can still be viable - but only if programmers start treating it with more attention instead of just a throwaway signal that gets no love. It's an interesting read, even if you don't agree with his conclusions. 

Will AM radio survive the rise of the electric car? Here are the challenges it faces

 

July 4, 2022 3:30 pm  #2


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

But aren't there government regulations limiting the levels of RF  interference being radiated?


You don't have to be a good sport to be a mad one.
 

July 4, 2022 3:36 pm  #3


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

To quote from the second article (which cites American rules) :

"FCC rules require that no consumer component cause interference to radio reception, and must accept interference from broadcast radio transmission. But to my knowledge, the rule has not been enforced with any regularity in years. Indeed, LED lights, cable boxes, fluorescent lights, and computers and more all cause interference, and I haven’t heard of any product being pulled off the market for doing so."

As long as no one cares about this issue, it will never be fixed. 

     Thread Starter
 

July 4, 2022 4:37 pm  #4


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

So much for the FCC's supposed effort to save AM radio in recent years.

 

July 4, 2022 5:12 pm  #5


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

The lack of enforcement in Canada started many years ago with the introduction of the replacement of PCC streetcars in Toronto.  The speed control systems generated not only hash, but a whine corresponding to the speed of the electric motors. According to Section 9.1 of the Radiocommunication Act: " 9 (1) No person shall


  • [size=100](b) without lawful excuse, interfere with or obstruct any radiocommunication;"
  • Clearly this has all fallen by the wayside, and the noise level from sources noted by RadioActive overwhelms a lot of AM signals.  The old standard of 5 mV/m for residential reception is now almost useless, and even 25 mV/m suffers in high noise areas.
    It isn't a question of whether, but when, AM radio dies, unless there is an adoption of an all-digital AM standard. That won't happen, because there is no end-game for AM and FM radio in either Canada or the United States. Existing broadcasters are opposed to anything that either allows for new entrants, or puts their weaker competitors on a more level playing field. IBOC (hybrid digital) radio has now been around for more than 20 years, and is still considered "experimental" in Canada.  If the regulators had set their minds to it at the outset, we would now be all-digital on both the AM and FM bands, and without the compromises caused by the hybrid schemes. 
    It may not be widely known, but the chip set for HD radio is quite capable of decoding pure digital signals, optimized for the total available bandwidth.
    The reason the transition to digital television succeeded was that there was an end game, which was the forced cessation of analog transmission.[/size]

 

July 4, 2022 5:38 pm  #6


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

All this fuss about no AM. Internet radio is an option. Just listen to the AM station online.
Problem solved.
 


RadioWiz & RadioQuiz are NOT the same person. 
RadioWiz & THE Wiz are NOT the same person.

 
 

July 4, 2022 6:00 pm  #7


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

Bill Dulmage wrote:

So much for the FCC's supposed effort to save AM radio in recent years.

That effort just led to more FM stations. 

They allowed AM stations to have FM translators, so naturally broadcasters quickly flipped AM stations to cheaply-run music formats branded 100% by their FM "repeater."

You can't legislate demand.

 


 
 

July 4, 2022 6:03 pm  #8


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

Radiowiz wrote:

All this fuss about no AM. Internet radio is an option. Just listen to the AM station online.
Problem solved.
 

It doesn't really solve the problem. Once someone has set themsef up to stream in the car, those AM stations' streams suddenly become just one of infinite options. The cost-structure to the run the stations can't handle that competition. 

Last edited by RadioAaron (July 4, 2022 6:04 pm)


 
 

July 4, 2022 6:12 pm  #9


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

I'm about 1 year and 4 months into EV ownership.  The lack of AM is frustrating, only to the extent that Rogers and other team owners haven't stood up to Major League Baseball.  MLB imposes internet blackouts.  The games aren't streamed on CJCL 590 Toronto's Internet stream.  CBS sports is substituted.  So, on several instances, in the past few weeks, we have been unable to listen to the Blue Jays games.  The HD3 signal on 92.5 dies around Holland Marsh, so although we listen to CJCL on HD3 in the Toronto area, the signal barely reaches parts of Oakville or very far down the QEW.  So, the Toronto Blue Jays broadcasts will have a diminishing in-car audience.  Of course if Rogers implemented HD on CHFI (Master Antenna issues at CN Tower), the coverage would be much better.    I've taken various A.M. radios along, including a pretty good Sangean, and reception is impossible in a Tesla.  
Last comment, there are many areas north of Barrie, to Collingwood where the cell service to the car is not reliable.  Same situation in Prince Edward County.  So streaming is hit & miss and very frustrating.  Case in point, listening to Blair and Barker on the CJCL Sportsnet feed hass been frustrating during road trips. You basically have to re-boot the TuneIn app, every time the cell coverage "dies".  That's my experience. Perhaps other EV owners would like to weigh in.  

Last edited by tvguy (July 4, 2022 6:15 pm)

 

July 4, 2022 6:14 pm  #10


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

RadioAaron wrote:

Radiowiz wrote:

All this fuss about no AM. Internet radio is an option. Just listen to the AM station online.
Problem solved.
 

It doesn't really solve the problem. Once someone has set themsef up to stream in the car, those AM stations' streams suddenly become just one of infinite options. The cost-structure to the run the stations can't handle that competition. 

Yeah that's right. Let News radio 88 inform of what's going on in Toronto news, weather sports and traffic... 
The only alarming concern is that people might actually want the American viewpoint on a ball game instead of 
AM 590 Toronto's point of view.
Same with Hockey & other sports.


RadioWiz & RadioQuiz are NOT the same person. 
RadioWiz & THE Wiz are NOT the same person.

 
 

July 4, 2022 6:18 pm  #11


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

In answer to Radiowiz, in my EV, the TuneIn app "features" Canadian local and regional stations AM & FM on the "landing page".  So Canadian stations throughout the region, are pretty well represented.  But as noted in my first posting, signal loss (LTE dropouts) disrupts streamed stations in rural Ontario.

 

July 4, 2022 6:18 pm  #12


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

Radiowiz wrote:

RadioAaron wrote:

Radiowiz wrote:

All this fuss about no AM. Internet radio is an option. Just listen to the AM station online.
Problem solved.
 

It doesn't really solve the problem. Once someone has set themsef up to stream in the car, those AM stations' streams suddenly become just one of infinite options. The cost-structure to the run the stations can't handle that competition. 

Yeah that's right. Let News radio 88 inform of what's going on in Toronto news, weather sports and traffic... 
The only alarming concern is that people might actually want the American viewpoint on a ball game instead of 
AM 590 Toronto's point of view.
Same with Hockey & other sports.

Yes, there's a loss. But there's no business case to keep it going. A live and local audio stream of highly paid hosts and journalists cannot pay for itself. It's over.


 
 

July 4, 2022 7:30 pm  #13


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

This may sound like a dumb question (and it may be) but I admit my ignorance on this - does this AM interference also happen on a hybrid model? Would the interference only occur when it's being used in electric mode and not gas? Or are they eliminating AM from those, as well?

     Thread Starter
 

July 5, 2022 4:45 pm  #14


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

I’m on the US west coast right now, and my observation is that even News/talk formats have moved off AM there. Seattle’s top news/talk station is KIRO-FM 97.3, which used to broadcast on 710 AM - now occupied by an ESPN station. And in Portland, the top news station is KXL 101.1, which moved from 750 AM - also now a sports station. Both cities have NPR stations on FM as well, and Portland, like Toronto, has streetcars with overhead wires.

 

July 5, 2022 6:39 pm  #15


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

My 2003 Buick, I bought it new. And from the day I drove it off the lot, the only AM sations I could listen to were the locals. The rest of the band was plagued with ignition noise. I complained to GM but they did nothing about it. They just said there was nothing wrong with my radio. I knew that. The radio was only doing what it was designed to do.

My wife could always tell when I was coming up the road. It would interfere with the picture on her TV.


You don't have to be a good sport to be a mad one.
 

July 5, 2022 9:32 pm  #16


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

RadioAaron wrote:

Radiowiz wrote:

RadioAaron wrote:


It doesn't really solve the problem. Once someone has set themsef up to stream in the car, those AM stations' streams suddenly become just one of infinite options. The cost-structure to the run the stations can't handle that competition. 

Yeah that's right. Let News radio 88 inform of what's going on in Toronto news, weather sports and traffic... 
The only alarming concern is that people might actually want the American viewpoint on a ball game instead of 
AM 590 Toronto's point of view.
Same with Hockey & other sports.

Yes, there's a loss. But there's no business case to keep it going. A live and local audio stream of highly paid hosts and journalists cannot pay for itself. It's over.

I view things differently. CityNews 680 is the one station that will survive because the resources merge creatively and perfectly, including a "Citynews everywhere" overnight that isn't local, but keeps the lights on across the country.
It's a business, yes, but it's also a service.
Even when it's local, at least there is content filled that can air on other Citynews radio stations.  

It costs a lot of money tor run a radio station and nothing to turn on the radio, but much of the content airs on more than just one AM radio station. Things will work out. Rogers always finds ways to keep 680 on the air.



 


RadioWiz & RadioQuiz are NOT the same person. 
RadioWiz & THE Wiz are NOT the same person.

 
 

July 6, 2022 1:44 am  #17


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

RadioAaron wrote:

Bill Dulmage wrote:

So much for the FCC's supposed effort to save AM radio in recent years.

That effort just led to more FM stations. 

They allowed AM stations to have FM translators, so naturally broadcasters quickly flipped AM stations to cheaply-run music formats branded 100% by their FM "repeater."

You can't legislate demand.

 

A lot of the FM translators are heard on the AM band in the United States with some radio stations simulcasting their AM signals on FM here in Canada such as:

630 AM CFCO - 92.9 Chatham, Ontario
980 AM CJME - Various FM transmitters Regina, Saskatchewan
1070 AM CHOK - 103.9 FM Sarnia, Ontario
1260 AM CKHQ - 103.5 FM/95.1 Moncton, New Brunswick
1310 AM CIWW - 101.1 FM CJET Ottawa, Ontario
1580 AM CKDO - 107.7 FM Oshawa, Ontario

I believe that's it unless I'm missing a few.

AM stations denied to operate FM transmitters:

560 AM CFOS - 96.1 FM Owen Sound, Ontario (link to CRTC)
920 AM CKNX - 104.3 FM Wingham, Ontario (link to CRTC)




 

 

July 6, 2022 5:59 am  #18


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

Scorpio42 wrote:

some radio stations simulcasting their AM signals on FM here in Canada such as:

630 AM CFCO - 92.9 Chatham, Ontario
980 AM CJME - Various FM transmitters Regina, Saskatchewan
1070 AM CHOK - 103.9 FM Sarnia, Ontario
1260 AM CKHQ - 103.5 FM/95.1 Moncton, New Brunswick
1310 AM CIWW - 101.1 FM CJET Ottawa, Ontario
1580 AM CKDO - 107.7 FM Oshawa, Ontario

I believe that's it unless I'm missing a few.

You forgot:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/c/c9/CFZM_ZoomerRadio.svg/1920px-CFZM_ZoomerRadio.svg.png

 

Last edited by Radiowiz (July 6, 2022 6:00 am)


RadioWiz & RadioQuiz are NOT the same person. 
RadioWiz & THE Wiz are NOT the same person.

 
 

July 6, 2022 11:12 pm  #19


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

Scorpio42 wrote:

RadioAaron wrote:

Bill Dulmage wrote:

So much for the FCC's supposed effort to save AM radio in recent years.

That effort just led to more FM stations. 

They allowed AM stations to have FM translators, so naturally broadcasters quickly flipped AM stations to cheaply-run music formats branded 100% by their FM "repeater."

You can't legislate demand.

 

A lot of the FM translators are heard on the AM band in the United States with some radio stations simulcasting their AM signals on FM here in Canada such as:

630 AM CFCO - 92.9 Chatham, Ontario
980 AM CJME - Various FM transmitters Regina, Saskatchewan
1070 AM CHOK - 103.9 FM Sarnia, Ontario
1260 AM CKHQ - 103.5 FM/95.1 Moncton, New Brunswick
1310 AM CIWW - 101.1 FM CJET Ottawa, Ontario
1580 AM CKDO - 107.7 FM Oshawa, Ontario

I believe that's it unless I'm missing a few.

AM stations denied to operate FM transmitters:

560 AM CFOS - 96.1 FM Owen Sound, Ontario (link to CRTC)
920 AM CKNX - 104.3 FM Wingham, Ontario (link to CRTC)




 

Also a common practice for the CBC, at least in Western Canada. It makes sense in the Prairie provinces where AM signals can efficiently cover a large area, but it surprises me that they’ve opted to keep AM 690 in Vancouver along with FM 88.1 and various repeaters. They cover the AM coverage area decently with the FM transmitters.

 

July 7, 2022 1:48 pm  #20


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

with the HD service picking up on FM and yes, the CN Tower issues with now ancient Master FM, is anything being done on the CN or it is what it is?

 

July 7, 2022 3:31 pm  #21


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

Skywave may have more recent info about CN Tower.   When last I heard anything, the big guys had not agreed on the Master FM antenna upgrade costs.  May also be some electrical infrastructure costs too.
Rogers is saying publicly in CRTC filings that it is not prepared to proceed with IBOC HD, so that may pose a problem in terms of Master FM upgrade.  Rogers of course has CityNews and Sportsnet on its FCP 92.5 HD cluster.  Bell is likely happy enough having 99.9 as its HD host (on its own antenna - 1050, 1010, and its Country format) and might not be eager to spend more money on HD infrastructure at CN Tower.  So it basically comes down to Corus,  CHIN, CJRT and CBC Radio 2, and Stingray (Boom) who are the other major Master Antenna tenants.  One other question, and Skywave might know the answer...the Master FM antenna is approaching 50 years in service in June 2026 - so would there be replacement or upgrade in the normal life cycle of an asset such as that, at around 50 years?  If anyone has more current info, please weigh in.

 

Last edited by tvguy (July 7, 2022 3:33 pm)

 

July 7, 2022 4:40 pm  #22


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

tvguy wrote:

Skywave may have more recent info about CN Tower.   When last I heard anything, the big guys had not agreed on the Master FM antenna upgrade costs.  May also be some electrical infrastructure costs too.
Rogers is saying publicly in CRTC filings that it is not prepared to proceed with IBOC HD, so that may pose a problem in terms of Master FM upgrade.  Rogers of course has CityNews and Sportsnet on its FCP 92.5 HD cluster.  Bell is likely happy enough having 99.9 as its HD host (on its own antenna - 1050, 1010, and its Country format) and might not be eager to spend more money on HD infrastructure at CN Tower.  So it basically comes down to Corus,  CHIN, CJRT and CBC Radio 2, and Stingray (Boom) who are the other major Master Antenna tenants.  One other question, and Skywave might know the answer...the Master FM antenna is approaching 50 years in service in June 2026 - so would there be replacement or upgrade in the normal life cycle of an asset such as that, at around 50 years?  If anyone has more current info, please weigh in.

 

That must be the oldest antenna in place worldwide right now.    Thats played a lot of songs over the decades!

Last edited by markow202 (July 7, 2022 4:41 pm)

 

July 7, 2022 7:32 pm  #23


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

I don't have any late info on the CN. My understanding is the same as tvguy's. The Rogers statement in its filing to the CRTC Radio Policy Review was indeed a curious position, as CHFI is a charter member of Master FM. There were five original owners of Master FM - CHUM, CKFM, CHFI, CHIN and CBC. All the subsequent stations are tenants of Master FM for the use of the antenna, and the CN Tower for use of transmitter space. The acquisition CKFM and CHUM are now under the common ownership of Bell Media.

The Alford antenna at the Empire State building made it to about 55 years, but in its later years was relegated to standby use. Guess what - the CN Tower Master FM antenna is an Alford type 4951 manufactured under license by EMI. The antenna is reasonably well protected from the elements, apart from incidental water leaks at the radome joints. The radome protects the dipoles from the corrosive effects of airborne pollution.  There are no moving parts (apart from expansion and contraction of the metal),  and the harness cables are pressurized to keep out moisture, so the lifetime is indefinite (but still finite). The weak areas are the flange connectors and inner conductor bullets, because they do get hot. So 46 years is starting to push it.

Adding HD requires an upgrade because the antenna was designed for analog transmission only based on 11 frequencies.  The HD signal not only adds up to 12% more power in MP3 mode, but the plethora of digital carriers can result in significant voltage spikes when the digital carriers from all the stations add up randomly. All of this must be taken into account in sizing the harness cables, connectors, and the combiner modules. 
 

 

July 8, 2022 10:30 am  #24


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

Skywave wrote:

I don't have any late info on the CN. My understanding is the same as tvguy's. The Rogers statement in its filing to the CRTC Radio Policy Review was indeed a curious position, as CHFI is a charter member of Master FM. There were five original owners of Master FM - CHUM, CKFM, CHFI, CHIN and CBC. All the subsequent stations are tenants of Master FM for the use of the antenna, and the CN Tower for use of transmitter space. The acquisition CKFM and CHUM are now under the common ownership of Bell Media.

The Alford antenna at the Empire State building made it to about 55 years, but in its later years was relegated to standby use. Guess what - the CN Tower Master FM antenna is an Alford type 4951 manufactured under license by EMI. The antenna is reasonably well protected from the elements, apart from incidental water leaks at the radome joints. The radome protects the dipoles from the corrosive effects of airborne pollution.  There are no moving parts (apart from expansion and contraction of the metal),  and the harness cables are pressurized to keep out moisture, so the lifetime is indefinite (but still finite). The weak areas are the flange connectors and inner conductor bullets, because they do get hot. So 46 years is starting to push it.

Adding HD requires an upgrade because the antenna was designed for analog transmission only based on 11 frequencies.  The HD signal not only adds up to 12% more power in MP3 mode, but the plethora of digital carriers can result in significant voltage spikes when the digital carriers from all the stations add up randomly. All of this must be taken into account in sizing the harness cables, connectors, and the combiner modules. 
 

Fantastic info as always.   Id love a tour of that place. 
 

 

July 13, 2022 10:03 am  #25


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

RadioActive asked about hybrid automobiles and AM radio reception, above.

My mom has a 2008 Toyota Camry Hybrid and the AM reception is good.  My late dad would likely have never bought the car if it didn't have an AM radio with a decent tuner.  He was a DXer and frequent dial twister especially traveling through the BC Interior.  Ah the joys of hot summer road trips and a barely audible signal underneath the electrical noise . . .https://cdn.boardhost.com/emoticons3/grin.png

Last edited by albertaboy4life (July 13, 2022 10:03 am)


https://radiowest.ca/forum/download/file.php?avatar=40.jpgFaster cars, younger women, older cheese, more money . . .
 

July 19, 2022 10:39 am  #26


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

Here is a good article regarding which car companies are removing AM from EVs and Hybrids.The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio0 CommentsWritten by Guest Author in CommutingElectric VehiclesEntertainmentGreen TechnologyIndustry NewsPlug-in Hybridshttps://blog.consumerguide.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2021/07/Screen-Shot-2021-07-19-at-4.42.42-PM-1024x657.png
The all-electric 2021 Volkswagen ID.4 is not available with AM radio.By Jim Flammang

At this point it’s fairly clear that electric vehicles are the future, but the road to get there is full of hurdles big and small. One of the smaller challenges, at least for a good number of traditional consumers, is this: Electric cars have a problem with AM radio. Why? Because the electric motors that power their drive wheels, propelling the vehicle, also tend to generate electromagnetic interference with AM broadcast reception. 

Porsche, for one, has advised that this interference may result in static and crackling sounds. Other automakers point out such possible audio annoyances as distortion, buzzing, and signal fading.

Note that the interference potential applies only to “terrestrial” AM radio. That’s the ground-based transmission method whereby signals are sent from the broadcast transmitter through the air, directly to the radio receiver. Electric motors have no impact on internet-based streaming audio. FM radio reception also is unaffected. 

Electric Cars and AM Radio

What Causes the Static?

Many electronic components, including electric motors, have always produced static of some sort. Electric cars are powered by one or more electric motors, fed by a rechargeable battery. Rapidly fluctuating voltage results in the high-level, low-frequency electromagnetic interference that reaches into the radio.

Electromagnetic frequencies generated by EV motors happen to be comparable in wavelength to AM radio signals. The competing signals clash, effectively cancelling each other, as if they were opposing forces. As EV motors grow more powerful, AM static tends to increase. 

Automaker Responses

Concern about electromagnetic interference is nothing new. Back in 2016, a Tesla spokesperson wrote that “AM audio quality can be very poor” in a full-electric car. BMW noted that it had recognized the interference problem early, in its 2009 Mini E and 2012 ActiveE models.

BMW took the lead in skipping AM radio, when the German automaker introduced the i3 sedan as a 2014 model. A spokesperson explained at the time that electric-motor interference was the reason. If AM were not disabled in the i3, unhappy customers were likely to complain about poor sound quality. BMW’s performance standards were very high, the explanation continued. No product that failed to comply would be acceptable.

Tesla followed suit in 2018, omitting AM radio in the original Model S as well as the newer Model X, while introducing an updated internet-radio option. No current Tesla product offers terrestrial AM radio.

Among recently introduced and coming-soon models, Porsche deleted AM radio from its new-for-2019 Taycan’s standard-equipment list. No Audi full-electric models come with AM radio reception, led by the e-Tron. “We don’t want our drivers to have a poor experience,” an Audi spokesperson advised. Many “radio favorites are available seamlessly through digital signals,” via a cellular or wi-fi connection.

Mercedes-Benz hasn’t released a features list for its forthcoming EQS battery-electric sedan, because it won’t reach dealerships for a while yet. We wouldn’t bet that terrestrial AM radio will be included in a car that hovers around the $100,000 neighborhood.

The EV’s “drivetrain generates frequencies that heavily interfere with AM … signals,” a Mercedes-Benz representative explained. “This leads to static, buzzing, and distorted sounds that can overwhelm and block out the broadcast [and] lead to customer dissatisfaction.

”Volvo’s new XC40 Recharge and C40 Recharge omit AM radio because of potential interference.

No specific word yet on audio prospects for Cadillac’s new Lyriq, the GMC Hummer large EV pickup – or for a new brand in town, the Lucid Air, scheduled for unveiling in September 2021.As for more-mainstream models, Ford is keeping AM radio in the Mustang Mach-E, as well as the new F-150 Lightning pure-electric pickup. A GM spokesperson told the Wall Street Journal that the company was aware of AM reception problems and had “taken steps,” but no details were supplied.

Not every automaker wishes to comment. Some stay mum on details of new models that have not yet been introduced.

See also: https://blog.consumerguide.com/end-terrestrial-radio-electric-cars-radio/
 

Last edited by tvguy (July 19, 2022 10:54 am)

 

July 19, 2022 10:53 am  #27


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

Automotive News reported this week, under the headline "Detroit 3 sticking with AM radio":

"the Detroit 3 say they intend to keep the aging (AM) technology even as they transition their lineups to battery power.  

Volvo and BMW told The Drive for a report this month their EVs draw from batteries generates too much audio interference for their liking. Audi. Porsche and Tesla also sell EVs without AM Radios.

But General Motors, and ford Motor Co. aren't eager to toss the AM dial aside.  The Ford F-150 Lightning and Mustang Mach-E, Cadillac Lyric, Chevrolet Bolt andGMC Hummer EV all offer AM radio and have not been inundated with  complaints about poor sound.   The Drive contacted GM, Ford and Stellantis - whose predecessor included AM Radio on the Fiat 500e - and found that the difference likely has more to do with the fact that A.M. radio has all but disappeared in Europe.  In the U.S. meanwhile, A.M. radio remains the only terrestrial listening option on some rural highways because the signal travels further than FM stations with higher quality.  In a 2021 survey of U.S. drivers, 89 percent said radio should be a standard requirement, compared with 84 percent who said USB ports should be.  Tesla included AM radio on the Model S sedan before phasing it out in 2018.  BMW still offers AM radio on its hybrids but has left the technology off EVs starting with the first battery-powered nameplates the i3 and i8".

 

July 19, 2022 10:54 am  #28


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

I was just going to say, Electric car and AM radio dont sound like a good recipe unless they would have some major filtering going on, its not worth that funding to do so. 

 

July 31, 2022 10:20 am  #29


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

Alan Cross has addressed this issue in one of his latest columns. He doesn't see much of an immediate solution beyond streaming or HD, but both of those have their own challenges. 

How electric vehicles could spell death for the oldest form of radio broadcasting

     Thread Starter
 

August 7, 2022 7:17 am  #30


Re: The End of Terrestrial Radio? Electric Cars and AM Radio

Woke up early Sunday morning and turned on the radio. NT1010 was replaying an interview Jerry Agar did with a guy from Driving.ca about the lack of AM radios in new electric cars. What struck me was during the entire 12 minute or so segment, they talked about FM, online and streaming. Not once did either of them so much as mention the existence of HD Radio. 

While the big broadcasters are still putting those signals out there, it's becoming increasingly clear they don't care about HD or barely even acknowledge its existence. How long till they turn those extra signals piggybacked on their FMs off for good?

     Thread Starter