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July 12, 2018 11:05 pm  #1


Friday Flashback: The Art Of The Chart, Part 1

While we were all collecting CHUM, CKEY, CKFH and CKOC charts growing up here, our counterparts in other cities and other lands were doing the same thing. The days of the free handouts lasted a couple of decades, before it became too expensive, stations changed formats or it just wasn’t popular enough anymore.
 
I was always fascinated to see how other stations handled these handouts. Some were incredibly well designed, with cover art, pictures inside and more. Others were barely more than reproduced mimeographs. But all were used to showcase the personality of the place they represented.
 
Here’s a look at how the other half lived, including some rare listings for some rare stations.
 
2SM Sydney, Australia
 
Although it’s a talk station now, 2SM once ruled the Top 40 roost in Sydney.
 
What I love about these charts is just how different the music scene was Down Under than it was here. Take this list of the singles from March 1975. The number one song that week was “Horror Movie” by the Skyhooks. Who? It obviously never traveled into this hemisphere.
 
Neither did “My Little Angel” (#7) by William Shakespeare (although likely not THAT William Shakespeare!) But perhaps the oddest of the Top 10 is the song called “Santa Never Made It Into Darwin” by the no doubt legendary Bill & Boyd. My question: What was an apparent Christmas song doing in the Top 10 at the end of March? (Actually, it's a touching song about the aftermath of a terrible cyclone hitting that Australian city on Christmas Day 1974, leaving massive destruction in its wake.)
 
http://farm1.staticflickr.com/923/43279932451_25f8b84963_b.jpg
 
WABC Top 100 Of 1969
 
The most successful Top 40 station of all time regularly put out a chart that wasn’t always strictly a weekly 40. In fact most of them consisted of the same 14 songs that made up their shortened playlist, a key to WABC’s successful strategy. (“Just play the hits over and over.”) They also put out a special Top 100 in 1969. It not only shows the biggest songs of that year, it also gives you a glimpse of that powerhouse line-up that mixed with that powerhouse signal to make ABC not only #1 in New York, but reportedly in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, too. No other station has ever managed to do that.


http://farm1.staticflickr.com/841/43308643771_f3d5bbfdb2_b.jpg
 
http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1787/41498942730_2ddfb54b1c_b.jpg
 
CFCF Montreal
 
Considering they weren’t really even a full rock station back in 1967, this “Dave Boxer” chart from August 25 is pretty impressive. There’s still some debate as to whether the place once known as XWA when it signed on in 1919 deserves the designation of the very first radio station in history, but one thing is sure – it wouldn’t make it to its hundredth anniversary. The station went broke and signed off in 2010, some 90 years after it first came to life.

 
http://farm1.staticflickr.com/920/43231539262_37a0365d5b_b.jpg

http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1781/43231537332_544a897eec_b.jpg
 
 
CFRA Ottawa
 
Now a major talk station in the nation’s capital, it was a rockin’ presence back in the 60s and 70s. This chart is from 1970, just before Can Con rules went into effect, and you’ll notice the only two Canadian artists in the top 30 are The Guess Who and The Original Caste. A year later, things would be very different.

 
http://farm1.staticflickr.com/841/43231585252_092f422edc_b.jpg
 

CKCY & CJIC Sault Ste. Marie
 
Billed as the station that’s been “your hit authority for the past two decades,” this small station brought the music to the true Great White North. But it didn’t do it forever. The 920 frequency went silent in the summer of 1992. This chart is from better times - Aug. 10, 1973. Although their morning man pictured on the cover looks like he had a rough night.


http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1822/29410544978_3d4e6b54ea_b.jpg

http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1829/43280534551_46fd807bb7_b.jpg
 
 
Meanwhile, CHUM wasn’t the only 1050 that was playing the hits in Ontario. Here’s a look at CJIC, CKCY’s competition in the Sault. In a deal involving different owners, both stations went silent in 1992.
http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1768/42428290805_233d1f1f29_b.jpg

http://farm1.staticflickr.com/913/42428291655_8d18396d4e_b.jpg

 
 
RPM 100
 
Not from a radio station at all, this weekly handout was designed to promote and get you to support Canadian talent - and subscribe to RPM Weekly. This one is from Dec. 1966, and was an early booster of Canadian content, long before we knew the term. 

http://farm1.staticflickr.com/846/28411540227_4b67397ba0_b.jpg

http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1762/42376848355_7a623f4c6e_b.jpg

  
KDIA Oakland, Ca.
 
It wasn’t all Top 40. Here’s a sample of a soul station from Oakland, California, whose biggest claim to fame is that Sylvester Stewart was once a DJ there. He became much better known as Sly of “Sly & The Family Stone” in the 60s and 70s. See how many – if any – of the tunes you recognize from 1979. KDIA’s calls are now at 1640, where it’s a Christian station.


http://farm1.staticflickr.com/922/43280851301_e2a2a6b191_b.jpg
http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1784/28411579547_550be12c71_b.jpg

 
KFRC San Francisco
 
The legendary 610 was in its waning days when this chart came out in 1979. It had been the home to so many legendary jocks, it could fill its own Hall of Fame. The most famous: morning man Dr. Don Rose, who used more jokes in each stopset than most announcers did in an entire show. KFRC’s spot on the AM dial is now occupied by KEAR, a Christian station.  


http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1810/43284750441_784228b15d_b.jpg
 http://farm1.staticflickr.com/839/42381062545_aea0605430_b.jpg

 
KHJ Los Angeles
 
One of the greatest radio stations on the planet in the 60s had to be 93/KHJ. The Boss Jocks were amazing, the sound was incredible and the station itself ruled the second biggest media market in the world until FM took over. KHJ is now an all religious station in L.A., presumably meaning it has a new kind of “boss” jock.

http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1763/29440721798_df3669570a_b.jpg

http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1762/28415775317_0ef02470e6_b.jpg

http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1781/43284902081_a742490d94_b.jpg
 
 
KRLA Los Angeles
 
KRLA put out a two sheet newspaper-like chart in the 70s, a takeoff on the look of Rolling Stone, called “Gathers No Moss.” On the back was a chart, this one from September 1970. Note the anti-drug/mental health PSA on the inside. These days KRLA is an uber-Conservative talk station in Glendale, known as “The Answer 870.”

http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1789/28415964207_a919321158_b.jpg


http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1788/28415984197_0631d40b38_b.jpg

http://farm1.staticflickr.com/923/42566956064_d19721701a_b.jpg
 
 
KMGQ Honolulu
 
If there’s anywhere better to be listening to great tunes in 1973 than on a lush Hawaiian Island, I can’t think of one. It’s somewhat of an oddity, because the chart lists the hit albums first. But check out the elaborate artwork on this chart, which shows someone went to a lot of trouble every week.


http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1807/41475184490_02cf1a7e58_b.jpg
http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1828/43236100442_0e7cb92287_b.jpg

 
KINY/KSUP Juneau, Alaska
 
From one side of the U.S. to the other. Here’s a look at what Alaskans were listening to on June 7, 1986. KINY is now an all talk station, while KSUP is Hot AC.

 
http://farm1.staticflickr.com/924/42568760284_37c61f0694_b.jpg
 
KOL Seattle
 
While KJR became legendary in Seattle, the CKFH to its CHUM was KOL. Here’s a Christmas one sheet chart from 1965, featuring disc jockey Dex Allen. Allen also worked in Pittsburgh and passed away just a few months ago, in May 2018.

 
http://farm1.staticflickr.com/840/41476995270_0a098c2bb5_b.jpg
 
WBOS Boston
 
This station proves, if nothing else, that an all disco format was typically unlistenable, although it apparently did O.K. in the early days of its dance music incarnation. Today it operates as an alternative rock outlet.

 
http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1801/29417056378_b33a1877d2_b.jpg
 

WXKS Boston
 
What’s worse than a disco station? Two disco stations. And Boston was home to both of them. Fortunately, WXKS is now Kiss 108, one of the biggest in the city and one of the most successful hit music stations in the U.S. 

http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1764/43237591512_8277858e5b_b.jpg
  
WBUS Miami
 
Remember when Quadraphonic was the new stereo? This station bought into the myth in 1976. Today, they’re rhythmic AC. Note how this is one of the few charts without any numeric rankings.

 
http://farm1.staticflickr.com/846/41477094410_952d908f82_b.jpg
 

WLCY Tampa/St.Petersburg, Florida
 
It would be fair to say that in the 60s and early 70s, listeners in Tampa-St. Pete’s loved “LCY.” It was once the number one Top 40 station in the city and while its chart wasn’t all that impressive looking, it helped to cement that dominance in the market. These days, the former LCY’s got some ’splainin to do- and it does, to people who work in the financial industry with an all business format and the call letters WWMI.
 
By the way, those calls don’t mean anything now, but a few years ago it was a Radio Disney operation and it stood for “We Want MIckey.”


http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1766/42407042165_03b5c87e3a_b.jpg
 
http://farm1.staticflickr.com/915/43311364961_3eda8c2e0b_b.jpg
 

WDGY & KDWB Minneapolis
 
One of the great powerhouses of the northern U.S., WDGY’s direct competitor was the equally great KDWB and the legendary KSTP. In a massive crazy series of events, when AM radio ran into trouble, WDGY disappeared and the call letters were eventually transferred to the station at 630 – which had been competitor KDWB. There’s currently an oldies station called WDGY at 740 AM, but it’s daytime only because of Moses Znaimer’s Zoomer Radio clear channel in Toronto. 


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http://farm1.staticflickr.com/914/28417704607_0dbe35b5a2_b.jpg

 

Next week, Part 2 – including the station that influenced Allan Waters to turn CHUM into Canada’s first Top 40 station, an unlikely competitor to CKLW, the only Top 40 station to have an ad in the original Woodstock Music Festival program, and a rare chart from – Cheektowaga?

 

July 13, 2018 7:54 pm  #2


Re: Friday Flashback: The Art Of The Chart, Part 1

Back in the very early '60s, my friends and I used to write to various stations requesting copies of their charts. Most responded positively. I did a bit of 'fake news' creating a WBZ Boston chart (they didn't publish one) that fooled all my friends. Think I had Carole King's "It might As Well Rain Until September" at #1. Highest listing for that song in North America
Great memories. Thnx to RadioActive 

 

July 13, 2018 9:30 pm  #3


Re: Friday Flashback: The Art Of The Chart, Part 1

Noticed a familiar name in the jock lineup on the WLCY Tampa/St. Pete chart. Jim Stanley and I worked at CHED Edmonton for a bit in the mid '60s, before he left for Florida in 1966.
A few years later, I started at CKLW on the all night show and was told by one of our great Ops, Colin Kennedy, just back from a Florida vacation and a station visit there, that Stanley used to listen to me every morning on his way in to do his AM show. Small world...big signal.

(Stanley knew my voice but couldn't figure out why I had to call myself Frank Brodie.)

When he left WLCY, he became PD in a town familiar to Blue Jay fans, Dunedin.

 

July 13, 2018 11:43 pm  #4


Re: Friday Flashback: The Art Of The Chart, Part 1

the cjic bit intersperses popular acts with on-air talent in the name list.  i remember lots of those guys from later years. 

Lou Turco is a soo city counselor, art osborne runs an online soo broadcast history email,  as far as i know, george jonescu is still doing sunday nights on AM 740.  Don Ramsay was a huge proponent of country music dating back to the 50s, Karl Sepkowski became the local tv news anchor for many years.  Even names like lionel mcauley and dick peplow are familiar.

Thanks for sharing that bit.

Also @Chuck, don't forget CHNO in sudbury.

 

July 14, 2018 5:47 am  #5


Re: Friday Flashback: The Art Of The Chart, Part 1

Some nice chart pics there !

Re Skyhooks from down under. I remember the name as they did get some FM airplay. Did not remember what they sounded like except that were touted as innovative but just googled and found this. Glam Rock:


Last edited by Fitz (July 14, 2018 5:48 am)


Cool Airchecks and More:
http://www.lettheuniverseanswer.com/
 

July 15, 2018 9:20 am  #6


Re: Friday Flashback: The Art Of The Chart, Part 1

mike marshall wrote:

Noticed a familiar name in the jock lineup on the WLCY Tampa/St. Pete chart. Jim Stanley and I worked at CHED Edmonton for a bit in the mid '60s, before he left for Florida in 1966.
A few years later, I started at CKLW on the all night show and was told by one of our great Ops, Colin Kennedy, just back from a Florida vacation and a station visit there, that Stanley used to listen to me every morning on his way in to do his AM show. Small world...big signal.

(Stanley knew my voice but couldn't figure out why I had to call myself Frank Brodie.)

O.K., I'll bite. Why DID you have to use the name "Frank Brodie?"

     Thread Starter
 

July 15, 2018 12:35 pm  #7


Re: Friday Flashback: The Art Of The Chart, Part 1

I used to go to Sam the Record Mall at Bayshore Mall in Ottawa to get these "bad boys" every Thursday...the CFGO chart was awesome, I had a collection of them...and they disappeared in various moves over the years...

But I lived for the chart each week as a pre-teen and teen...

I think I now have a life as an adult...(smiling)





http://i68.tinypic.com/1qn9zq.jpg


The world would be so good if it weren't for some people...
 

July 15, 2018 1:14 pm  #8


Re: Friday Flashback: The Art Of The Chart, Part 1

RadioActive wrote:

O.K., I'll bite. Why DID you have to use the name "Frank Brodie?"

Stanley, when he first heard me on the Big 8, thought, "OK, I know that voice, but I don't know that name," according to Colin Kennedy, when he came back from his vacation and told me his story.

There seems to be more than one reason for the name change.
When he decided he might possibly hire me, Paul Drew flew me in so he could meet me and have me see the station. That was the night I also met Rosalie Trombley, who was on the switchboard when I walked in. Rosie was working part-time then.
Paul interviewed me, showed me around the station, including the control room when Tom Shannon was on the air, and I flew back to Edmonton the same evening.
Drew called the next day to say the job was mine but I would have to change my name. At the time, Mike Rivers was doing afternoon drive and Marshall Armstrong was a 20/20 newsman: Paul said they didn't believe in similar names, too confusing. He asked me to think of a name and he'd get back to me.
When he did, I said, "How 'bout John Brodie, my two middle names?"
"Hmmm, let me think about that."
He called back the next day and said that John Brodie, quarterback of the 49ers, came into Detroit once every two years. "No good. Frank Brodie. I like Frank Brodie."
I told him I wasn't crazy about 'Frank,' doing my best not to push it.
He said that Brodie would appeal to the large Irish demo in Detroit and thought Frank would hit home with the strong Polish segment. Drew was from Detroit. He knew his city.
"And besides, Bill Drake has already cut your intros."

Years later, the aforementioned Mike Rivers wrote a page for the CKLW tribute site, including this brief mention:

>> I do remember the day they hired Frank Brodie - for the all-night shift. His real name was Mike Marshall, but Drew thought that sounded a little too 'radio-ey' so he invented Frank Brodie. <<

If that's the real reason, and I had known about it at the time, I might have fought a lot harder for my real name.

 

 

July 15, 2018 2:32 pm  #9


Re: Friday Flashback: The Art Of The Chart, Part 1

Wow, what a great story. You're the first person I've ever heard of who was born with a perfect radio name - and was forced to change it! And the reason has echoes of what Moses Znaimer did at City TV years later, hiring people or renaming them based partly on what part of the ethnic audience they might appeal to. Thanks for sharing that.  

     Thread Starter
 

July 16, 2018 6:08 am  #10


Re: Friday Flashback: The Art Of The Chart, Part 1

Thank you, RA, for this thread.