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February 7, 2019 3:35 pm  #1


Y'know, Y'know?

When did the expression 'Y'know' become such an ubiquitous part of our lexicon?  As a talk radio addict for many years, it has become so over-used as to become annoying.  Hosts are guilty (looking at you Cutrara), but the guests and callers don't seem able to utter a single thought without saying 'Y'know' repeatedly.  Try listening to Tasha's political panel, when she doesn't call in sick, and you will hear 'Y'know' at least a hundred times.  Inarticulate and maddening.

Last edited by Charlie (February 7, 2019 4:00 pm)

 

February 7, 2019 4:16 pm  #2


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Charlie wrote:

Try listening to Tasha's political panel

No.
 

 

February 7, 2019 4:21 pm  #3


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Ever notice how politicians like to use "lookit" when introducing a point?

 

February 7, 2019 4:40 pm  #4


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Peter the K wrote:

Ever notice how politicians like to use "lookit" when introducing a point?

Yes, and 'So' is popular as well.
 

     Thread Starter
 

February 7, 2019 4:42 pm  #5


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Chrisphen wrote:

Charlie wrote:

Try listening to Tasha's political panel

No.
 

Y'know, I don't mind Tasha, but you're wise to avoid that panel, y'know?
 

     Thread Starter
 

February 7, 2019 6:13 pm  #6


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

I interviewed the president-ceo of a small US truck manufacturer, used an automatic transcription system, and counted more than 200 'you know's in 15 minutes. That's a record here...

 

February 7, 2019 6:18 pm  #7


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Saul wrote:

I interviewed the president-ceo of a small US truck manufacturer, used an automatic transcription system, and counted more than 200 'you know's in 15 minutes. That's a record here...

If the truck-building thing doesn't work out, he might have a future on a 640 or 1010 panel.

 

Last edited by Charlie (February 7, 2019 6:19 pm)

     Thread Starter
 

February 7, 2019 6:26 pm  #8


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

He just might. I salvaged one (barely) usable sentence out of the whole thing.

 

February 7, 2019 6:48 pm  #9


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

"like..."

 

February 7, 2019 6:51 pm  #10


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Charlie wrote:

Yes, and 'So' is popular as well. 

"Like" no kidding. I'm "like" stoked that youse guyz "like" get it.

It's getting to the point that listening to hosts, and just as often guests, is "like" impossible. Are there "like" no pros left? It's "like" getting to the point where "like" the meaning of the word like is being altered.

Like wow, Man.
 


 
 

February 7, 2019 6:56 pm  #11


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Elliott Friedman was guilty of using You Know so often on his 31 Thoughts podcast, that he starting fining himself 5 dollars every time he said it.  It seems to have worked because I seldom hear him use that phrase anymore.

Another over-worked expression is:  At the end of the day....

 

February 7, 2019 7:15 pm  #12


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Chuck99 wrote:

Another over-worked expression is:  At the end of the day....

If we're making a list, how about  "the takeaway from this is..."   "the reality is..." or its variation "the fact of the matter is..."  

 

February 7, 2019 7:59 pm  #13


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

All the newsreaders on Global TV seem to be forever, "shifting gears".
 


 
 

February 7, 2019 11:43 pm  #14


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Chuck99 wrote:

Elliott Friedman was guilty of using You Know so often on his 31 Thoughts podcast, that he starting fining himself 5 dollars every time he said it.  It seems to have worked because I seldom hear him use that phrase anymore.

Another over-worked expression is:  At the end of the day....

At the end of the day, John Tory must say 'at the end of the day' at least 3 times every time he speaks.  Then again, when one sentence usually runs on for 5 minutes without even stopping for a breath, it's not all that surprising.
 

     Thread Starter
 

February 8, 2019 9:40 pm  #15


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

"the fact of the matter is..."
"all this to say.."
"and stuff like that..."
"good to have you"
"now, ..."
"frankly, ..."
"uh..."
"uhmm..."
"I feel that ..."
"suffice it to say ..."
"seriously. seriously? seriously?"

Even the better radio hosts can overuse a pet phrase when tired, and a bit off their game.

The best ones catch themselves doing it, and give it a rest, and the listeners a break.

PD's are definitely responsible for enabling the worst offenders.

.

 

February 8, 2019 9:50 pm  #16


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

i watch quite a bit of british comedy panel shows. (no surprise to betaylored, i'm sure!) the number of times the words "literally" and "genuinely" are uttered is beyond a drinking game.  i take it to mean that as comedians, they think the audience won't believe the story unless it is prefaced by one of those words.  or maybe it's just a placeholder akin to "so" or "like".

either way, it's literally lazy speech, and i genuinely believe that.
 

Last edited by splunge (February 8, 2019 9:51 pm)

 

February 8, 2019 9:54 pm  #17


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

on another note, i recall a sign stuck on the studio wall by my pd back in the 80s banning phrases like "the fab four" or "get the led out".  i know there were more... anyone else?

 

February 9, 2019 8:39 am  #18


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Do you watch 8 out of 10 cats does countdown?


splunge wrote:

i watch quite a bit of british comedy panel shows. (no surprise to betaylored, i'm sure!) the number of times the words "literally" and "genuinely" are uttered is beyond a drinking game.  i take it to mean that as comedians, they think the audience won't believe the story unless it is prefaced by one of those words.  or maybe it's just a placeholder akin to "so" or "like".

either way, it's literally lazy speech, and i genuinely believe that.
 

 


Madness takes its toll.  Please have exact change.
 
 

February 9, 2019 9:07 am  #19


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

ig wrote:

Do you watch 8 out of 10 cats does countdown?


splunge wrote:

i watch quite a bit of british comedy panel shows. (no surprise to betaylored, i'm sure!) the number of times the words "literally" and "genuinely" are uttered is beyond a drinking game.  i take it to mean that as comedians, they think the audience won't believe the story unless it is prefaced by one of those words.  or maybe it's just a placeholder akin to "so" or "like".

either way, it's literally lazy speech, and i genuinely believe that.
 

 

yep. cats, wilty, mock the week, and others... but by far my favourite is QI XL

 

February 9, 2019 10:56 am  #20


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Greetings all. I've just been a lurker on this version of the board, though I've been signed upon previous versions under another name. First post since I've signed up on this version.I've never earned a pay cheque in radio. I've always enjoyed listening to radio, though it has become a more challenging task in recent years. Sadly, it's a case of finding radio stations with the least number of annoying aspects.I can no longer handle the 'Valley Girl' syndrome that seems to afflict so many speakers in radio ( and media in general ). I'll not speak to the on air professionals. Some do to varying degrees, some don't. So, um like, you know, you know what, etc, peppered through out someones moment, or segment of conversation just has me guessing when their next, you know, like, kind of, will be inserted in their sentence. I end up focusing on the anticipation of when that next filler phrase will be, as apposed to the point they are trying to make.If the powers that be where they work find it's a problem, then it's a concern for that individual. If many other listeners find it a problem, and start tuning out in large numbers, then it's problem the media outlets in general. My time tuned in to talk radio (which I've enjoyed listening to most of it for many years) has dropped 90% in the last few years.I can't deal with being told to 'look' when someone begins their two bits worth. Telling me to 'listen' when I'm already listening doesn't help me 'hear' their point any better. If a guest speaker begins their bit with one of these, and has a few filler phrases throughout, I'm a bit more forgiving, but only to a point. Especially if others ( mainly on the round table gatherings on 1010 or 640 AM ) already are afflicted with this ailment, I'm no longer paying enough attention to get the point of what any of them are saying. Add the average citizen or person who, by happenstance is in the news because of whatever reason, or caller to a call in portion of a show, I'm tuning out. I get it that the guest, caller, aren't professional speakers, but add that to the professionals or guest speakers that do this, I'm done with it for the time being.The morning show on CFRB and some shows on CBC that I enjoy are about all I'm listening to, as far as the talk radio goes. A few of the specialty programs on the weekend, maybe, but those aren't as often as before.Please, no more magnesium pill shriller Moses. I switch to your 96.3 FM or CFTR overnight just to avoid any chance waking up in the middle of the night and hearing that annoying voice pitching his wares. It was mentioned in another thread, for those that enjoy  music that would be considered classic rock/oldies,the pickings are slim.97.3 FM, or 740 AM are about it for me, as far as what I can get with good reception.On those two, I'm usually good with them until I'm hit with several songs in a few sets of music I'm not fond of, disco and new wave mainly. I turn down the sound or change stations for a bit. If 92.9 FM The Grand, or 91.9 FM The Giant are coming in clear enough, they are an option. But that often isn't the case. I often have CFTR on the radio on one side of the room,with The Songs that Radio Forgot, on the computer.I can't handle competing music or talk stations on at the same time Thanks for that option Dale. My rant on this matter is done. At some point soon, I'll address some of those awkward, challenging to correctly pronounce, on air names.

 

February 9, 2019 11:59 am  #21


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Norman peters wrote:

Greetings all. I've just been a lurker on this version of the board, though I've been signed upon previous versions under another name. First post since I've signed up on this version.I've never earned a pay cheque in radio. I've always enjoyed listening to radio, though it has become a more challenging task in recent years. Sadly, it's a case of finding radio stations with the least number of annoying aspects.I can no longer handle the 'Valley Girl' syndrome that seems to afflict so many speakers in radio ( and media in general ). I'll not speak to the on air professionals. Some do to varying degrees, some don't. So, um like, you know, you know what, etc, peppered through out someones moment, or segment of conversation just has me guessing when their next, you know, like, kind of, will be inserted in their sentence. I end up focusing on the anticipation of when that next filler phrase will be, as apposed to the point they are trying to make.If the powers that be where they work find it's a problem, then it's a concern for that individual. If many other listeners find it a problem, and start tuning out in large numbers, then it's problem the media outlets in general. My time tuned in to talk radio (which I've enjoyed listening to most of it for many years) has dropped 90% in the last few years.I can't deal with being told to 'look' when someone begins their two bits worth. Telling me to 'listen' when I'm already listening doesn't help me 'hear' their point any better. If a guest speaker begins their bit with one of these, and has a few filler phrases throughout, I'm a bit more forgiving, but only to a point. Especially if others ( mainly on the round table gatherings on 1010 or 640 AM ) already are afflicted with this ailment, I'm no longer paying enough attention to get the point of what any of them are saying. Add the average citizen or person who, by happenstance is in the news because of whatever reason, or caller to a call in portion of a show, I'm tuning out. I get it that the guest, caller, aren't professional speakers, but add that to the professionals or guest speakers that do this, I'm done with it for the time being.The morning show on CFRB and some shows on CBC that I enjoy are about all I'm listening to, as far as the talk radio goes. A few of the specialty programs on the weekend, maybe, but those aren't as often as before.Please, no more magnesium pill shriller Moses. I switch to your 96.3 FM or CFTR overnight just to avoid any chance waking up in the middle of the night and hearing that annoying voice pitching his wares. It was mentioned in another thread, for those that enjoy  music that would be considered classic rock/oldies,the pickings are slim.97.3 FM, or 740 AM are about it for me, as far as what I can get with good reception.On those two, I'm usually good with them until I'm hit with several songs in a few sets of music I'm not fond of, disco and new wave mainly. I turn down the sound or change stations for a bit. If 92.9 FM The Grand, or 91.9 FM The Giant are coming in clear enough, they are an option. But that often isn't the case. I often have CFTR on the radio on one side of the room,with The Songs that Radio Forgot, on the computer.I can't handle competing music or talk stations on at the same time Thanks for that option Dale. My rant on this matter is done. At some point soon, I'll address some of those awkward, challenging to correctly pronounce, on air names.

A very good rant, and spot on!  It's comforting to know that I'm not the only one who is irritated by this kind of inarticulate verbal diarrhea.  I know, I know, I can always turn off talk radio if this stuff bugs me, but in my line of work, I need to be up to the minute on news events, and I find radio by far the most effective means of staying on top of not only current events, but what the public is paying attention to, and talking about.  So, folks, listen, at the end of the day, speakers should, like, be more aware of how they come across, y'know?
 

     Thread Starter
 

February 9, 2019 8:24 pm  #22


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Not a phrase -- just the habit of folks under a certain age to answer a Yes or No question not with either possible answer, but with something memorized from a training manual or employee procedure handbook, or a ramble sprinkled with "umms" and "likes." My comeback to this includes one or more of the following:  my, you do like to make speeches, you should run for office, you'd be the next Gretchen Whitmer (governor of Michigan), if I want a speech I'll watch CSPAN, it's a Yes or No question, doesn't it deserve a Yes or No answer? (Press them and you'll  eventually get one, but why should that be so difficult?)  Either way -- with y'knows, or excess verbiage -- you're watching the slow de-evolution of people's ability to communicate with each other. The general cheapening of the culture and things that were once respected, like language pre-Twitter, I think is at the root of this. (Someday, instead of "I do" at a wedding, or the swearing in of a president, will be acceptably replaced by "whatever .... ")

 

February 9, 2019 8:48 pm  #23


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Norman peters wrote:

Greetings all. I've just been a lurker on this version of the board, though I've been signed upon previous versions under another name. First post since I've signed up on this version.I've never earned a pay cheque in radio. I've always enjoyed listening to radio, though it has become a more challenging task in recent years. Sadly, it's a case of finding radio stations with the least number of annoying aspects.I can no longer handle the 'Valley Girl' syndrome that seems to afflict so many speakers in radio ( and media in general ). I'll not speak to the on air professionals. Some do to varying degrees, some don't. So, um like, you know, you know what, etc, peppered through out someones moment, or segment of conversation just has me guessing when their next, you know, like, kind of, will be inserted in their sentence. I end up focusing on the anticipation of when that next filler phrase will be, as apposed to the point they are trying to make.If the powers that be where they work find it's a problem, then it's a concern for that individual. If many other listeners find it a problem, and start tuning out in large numbers, then it's problem the media outlets in general. My time tuned in to talk radio (which I've enjoyed listening to most of it for many years) has dropped 90% in the last few years.I can't deal with being told to 'look' when someone begins their two bits worth. Telling me to 'listen' when I'm already listening doesn't help me 'hear' their point any better. If a guest speaker begins their bit with one of these, and has a few filler phrases throughout, I'm a bit more forgiving, but only to a point. Especially if others ( mainly on the round table gatherings on 1010 or 640 AM ) already are afflicted with this ailment, I'm no longer paying enough attention to get the point of what any of them are saying. Add the average citizen or person who, by happenstance is in the news because of whatever reason, or caller to a call in portion of a show, I'm tuning out. I get it that the guest, caller, aren't professional speakers, but add that to the professionals or guest speakers that do this, I'm done with it for the time being.The morning show on CFRB and some shows on CBC that I enjoy are about all I'm listening to, as far as the talk radio goes. A few of the specialty programs on the weekend, maybe, but those aren't as often as before.Please, no more magnesium pill shriller Moses. I switch to your 96.3 FM or CFTR overnight just to avoid any chance waking up in the middle of the night and hearing that annoying voice pitching his wares. It was mentioned in another thread, for those that enjoy  music that would be considered classic rock/oldies,the pickings are slim.97.3 FM, or 740 AM are about it for me, as far as what I can get with good reception.On those two, I'm usually good with them until I'm hit with several songs in a few sets of music I'm not fond of, disco and new wave mainly. I turn down the sound or change stations for a bit. If 92.9 FM The Grand, or 91.9 FM The Giant are coming in clear enough, they are an option. But that often isn't the case. I often have CFTR on the radio on one side of the room,with The Songs that Radio Forgot, on the computer.I can't handle competing music or talk stations on at the same time Thanks for that option Dale. My rant on this matter is done. At some point soon, I'll address some of those awkward, challenging to correctly pronounce, on air names.

Paragraphs, people. Paragraphs. 


 
 

February 10, 2019 1:14 am  #24


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

splunge wrote:

i watch quite a bit of british comedy panel shows. (no surprise to betaylored, i'm sure!) the number of times the words "literally" and "genuinely" are uttered is beyond a drinking game.  i take it to mean that as comedians, they think the audience won't believe the story unless it is prefaced by one of those words.  or maybe it's just a placeholder akin to "so" or "like".

either way, it's literally lazy speech, and i genuinely believe that.
 

 
Quite correct splunge, I'm not surprised you watch British comedy panel shows, and I do agree with your view that verbal crutches/placeholders are just genuinely, literally lazy. ;)

I read/watch/follow Susie Dent, Benjamin Dryer, and a few others that make language a living thing. QI gets top marks, and ig, I will be checking out 8 out of 10 cats, it looks like a hoot.

Yesterday Eric Idle was being interviewed, and he quipped that he's not worried about artificial intelligence, he's worried about artificial stupidity.

Artificially stupid is what people sound like when they get lazy with their language.

(I highly recommend Eric Idle's Sortabiography, both the book and the audiobook. That, and the Oxford comma.)

Last edited by betaylored (February 10, 2019 1:29 am)

 

February 10, 2019 1:37 am  #25


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

@betaylored, suzi dent also appears on the cats version of countdown (as an extension of her regular countdown duties).  she "takes the piss" quite often, but has learned to give as good as she gets!  Her recent videos about the origins of swearing were inspired by her inclusion in cats does countdown.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L77gk5QEZFo

you could also try david mitchell's soap box rants on language.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kge9ZzjsfW8
 

Last edited by splunge (February 10, 2019 1:40 am)

 

February 11, 2019 1:03 am  #26


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

splunge wrote:

@betaylored, suzi dent also appears on the cats version of countdown (as an extension of her regular countdown duties).  she "takes the piss" quite often, but has learned to give as good as she gets!  Her recent videos about the origins of swearing were inspired by her inclusion in cats does countdown.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L77gk5QEZFo

you could also try david mitchell's soap box rants on language.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kge9ZzjsfW8
 

The Susie Dent one was, quite literally, funny AF, and David Mitchell is a man after my own heart. I've saved both these videos to delight/torture friends and family as needed. Thanks splunge, I REALLY appreciate you sharing them both. 😀

I think that's one of the things I enjoy most about John Moore (mornings on Newstalk 1010) he throws words like eponymous around, paying his listeners the compliment of not simplifying the way he speaks, while still providing a Coles Notes background as required to help you understand a news report, or continuing story.

To be fair, Stafford and Supriya (mornings on GNR am 640) do a good job on the language front as well.

I still believe program directors should be 'reining their hosts in' when they 'go overboard' on the verbal crutches/placeholders.

Last edited by betaylored (February 11, 2019 1:09 am)

 

February 12, 2019 12:05 am  #27


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Y'know, listening to the radio on Monday, I really noticed every. single. vocal. hiccup.

 

February 15, 2019 6:16 pm  #28


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

Just heard Edward Keenan (filling in for Oakley) interview some twerp talking about self-driving cars, who probably set a new record for saying 'Y'know'.  In a 4 minute interview, he must have said 'Y'know' a hundred times.  This guy is a prime candidate for Tasha's Political Panel, if she ever bothers showing up for work.

     Thread Starter
 

February 15, 2019 8:57 pm  #29


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

John 'Yadda Yadda Yadda' Oakley? I know of his talent.

 

February 15, 2019 10:06 pm  #30


Re: Y'know, Y'know?

betaylored wrote:

Y'know, listening to the radio on Monday, I really noticed every. single. vocal. hiccup.

Thanks to QI, i know there's something called the Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon.  The theory states that once you stumble upon a new word, and that word appears in later conversations, you tend to believe you're hearing it everywhere.