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Thu Aug 24 8:16 pm  #1


The Best Fake D.J. Name In Radio History

There used to be an old not-so-funny radio joke that went, “At the station where I used to work, everybody used phony names. I mean everybody. Even the bathroom was called a George.”
 
Which brings me to the best fake radio names in history. What few announcers are left these days often use their real names. But in the old days of radio, it’s easy to understand why Kamel Amin Kasem became Casey Kasem.
 
I love really creative monikers that are obviously false but carry great meaning for the cities that they’re in. Grant Park, for instance, is a famous green space in Chicago. But he was also a traffic reporter at WLS-AM. And who can forget Don Valley, the name Roger Klein used on CFTR back in the 70s? A classic.  
 
It’s hard to know if the late Arthur W. Ferguson would have been a legend in radio if he hadn’t become better known as Charlie Tuna. And would Bob Smith be as beloved today if he hadn’t become Wolfman Jack? John Larch is an OK handle but nowhere near as memorable as Jackson Armstrong, the namesake of the famous “All American Boy” from the Golden Age of Radio drama.  
 
But the best may be a guy from Buffalo whose name is simply such a great nom de plume, it’s become my all time favourite. It’s WBEN-AM’s Sandy Beach. Not only is he a great broadcaster with both talk and Top 40 (from his days at WKBW, among others) on his resume, but he has the best laugh in all of radio and on Thursday, he was named to the New York State Broadcasters Hall of Fame for 2017.

The pseudonym is a fantastic play on words and very creative but it also sounds like it could be real. That’s what makes it perfect. I’m told his real name is Donald Pesola. Hardly as memorable.  
 
I once was young and stupid enough to go on air at a college station as “Skip Stone.” (Now I'm just old and stupid, but that's another story.) But that can’t hold a candle to “Sandy Beach.” Great broadcaster with an unforgettable moniker to match.

 

Thu Aug 24 10:32 pm  #2


Re: The Best Fake D.J. Name In Radio History

For best fake name morning show,
I nominate Froggy 97's James Pond and Cricket: http://froggy97.com/

 

Fri Aug 25 9:14 am  #3


Re: The Best Fake D.J. Name In Radio History

Here's an interesting  You Tube clip about how well traveled US DJ Shadoe Stevens assumed that name. Not by his choice and with reservation but it stuck. Listen from 4:48 to 12:00. 



 

Last edited by Fitz (Fri Aug 25 9:26 am)


Cool Airchecks and More:
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Fri Aug 25 11:07 am  #4


Re: The Best Fake D.J. Name In Radio History

RadioActive wrote:

The best may be a guy from Buffalo whose name is simply such a great nom de plume, it’s become my all time favourite. It’s WBEN-AM’s Sandy Beach. The pseudonym is a fantastic play on words and very creative but it also sounds like it could be real. That’s what makes it perfect. I’m told his real name is Donald Pesola. Hardly as memorable.  
 

Interesting. Don Pesola was also the name of the winning contestant in the WKRP episode "The Contest Nobody Could Win."

PJ

 

 

Fri Aug 25 12:27 pm  #5


Re: The Best Fake D.J. Name In Radio History

RadioActive wrote:

There used to be an old not-so-funny radio joke that went, “At the station where I used to work, everybody used phony names. I mean everybody. Even the bathroom was called a George.”
 
Which brings me to the best fake radio names in history. What few announcers are left these days often use their real names. But in the old days of radio, it’s easy to understand why Kamel Amin Kasem became Casey Kasem.
 
I love really creative monikers that are obviously false but carry great meaning for the cities that they’re in. Grant Park, for instance, is a famous green space in Chicago. But he was also a traffic reporter at WLS-AM. And who can forget Don Valley, the name Roger Klein used on CFTR back in the 70s? A classic.  
 
It’s hard to know if the late Arthur W. Ferguson would have been a legend in radio if he hadn’t become better known as Charlie Tuna. And would Bob Smith be as beloved today if he hadn’t become Wolfman Jack? John Larch is an OK handle but nowhere near as memorable as Jackson Armstrong, the namesake of the famous “All American Boy” from the Golden Age of Radio drama.  
 
But the best may be a guy from Buffalo whose name is simply such a great nom de plume, it’s become my all time favourite. It’s WBEN-AM’s Sandy Beach. Not only is he a great broadcaster with both talk and Top 40 (from his days at WKBW, among others) on his resume, but he has the best laugh in all of radio and on Thursday, he was named to the New York State Broadcasters Hall of Fame for 2017.

The pseudonym is a fantastic play on words and very creative but it also sounds like it could be real. That’s what makes it perfect. I’m told his real name is Donald Pesola. Hardly as memorable.  
 
I once was young and stupid enough to go on air at a college station as “Skip Stone.” (Now I'm just old and stupid, but that's another story.) But that can’t hold a candle to “Sandy Beach.” Great broadcaster with an unforgettable moniker to match.

Hard to believe Dan Ingram isn't in the New York State Broadcasters Hall of Fame. You'd think he'd be one of the first inductees along with WABC PD Rick Sklar and his WMCA counterpart Ruth Meyer. Also absent: long-time WBEN morning man Clint Buehlmann, WNEW-FM legend Alison Steele, Ted Brown and Gene Klaven from WNEW-AM, WNYC mainstay Jonathan Schwartz, pioneer DJ Martin Block and Bob Murphy, who broadcast the Mets for their first 50 years. And where's Mel Allen and Red Barber? For shame!

 

Fri Aug 25 8:01 pm  #6


Re: The Best Fake D.J. Name In Radio History

RadioActive wrote:

There used to be an old not-so-funny radio joke that went, “At the station where I used to work, everybody used phony names. I mean everybody. Even the bathroom was called a George.”
 
Which brings me to the best fake radio names in history. What few announcers are left these days often use their real names. But in the old days of radio, it’s easy to understand why Kamel Amin Kasem became Casey Kasem.
 
I love really creative monikers that are obviously false but carry great meaning for the cities that they’re in. Grant Park, for instance, is a famous green space in Chicago. But he was also a traffic reporter at WLS-AM. And who can forget Don Valley, the name Roger Klein used on CFTR back in the 70s? A classic.  
 
It’s hard to know if the late Arthur W. Ferguson would have been a legend in radio if he hadn’t become better known as Charlie Tuna. And would Bob Smith be as beloved today if he hadn’t become Wolfman Jack? John Larch is an OK handle but nowhere near as memorable as Jackson Armstrong, the namesake of the famous “All American Boy” from the Golden Age of Radio drama.  
 
But the best may be a guy from Buffalo whose name is simply such a great nom de plume, it’s become my all time favourite. It’s WBEN-AM’s Sandy Beach. Not only is he a great broadcaster with both talk and Top 40 (from his days at WKBW, among others) on his resume, but he has the best laugh in all of radio and on Thursday, he was named to the New York State Broadcasters Hall of Fame for 2017.

The pseudonym is a fantastic play on words and very creative but it also sounds like it could be real. That’s what makes it perfect. I’m told his real name is Donald Pesola. Hardly as memorable.  
 
I once was young and stupid enough to go on air at a college station as “Skip Stone.” (Now I'm just old and stupid, but that's another story.) But that can’t hold a candle to “Sandy Beach.” Great broadcaster with an unforgettable moniker to match.

When Sandy Beach was at WDRC, they had another jock at the station named Bradley Field, which was the name of a local airport. His real name was Ken Sasso,

http://www.wdrcobg.com/images/field072968.gif

 

Sat Aug 26 11:21 pm  #7


Re: The Best Fake D.J. Name In Radio History

more than one broadcaster used the name "sandy beach".

 

Sat Aug 26 11:25 pm  #8


Re: The Best Fake D.J. Name In Radio History

halifax broadcaster, andrew gillis, once used the name "les ismore". 

 

Sun Aug 27 11:49 am  #9


Re: The Best Fake D.J. Name In Radio History

Halifax producer/voice actor Doug Barron used to use the name "Hal Harbour" on-air.

 

Sun Aug 27 12:09 pm  #10


Re: The Best Fake D.J. Name In Radio History

Best VT name I've heard..  Dell Compaq.


Madness takes its toll.  Please have exact change.
 
 

Wed Sep 27 7:20 am  #12


Re: The Best Fake D.J. Name In Radio History

John Derringer

 

Wed Sep 27 7:47 am  #13


Re: The Best Fake D.J. Name In Radio History

ig wrote:

Best VT name I've heard..  Dell Compaq.

Or even Dell Lenovo.


Cheers,
Jody Thornton
 
 

Wed Sep 27 8:05 am  #14


Re: The Best Fake D.J. Name In Radio History

The linked article explains how a guy named James Hummell became "Rick Shaw," and he ruled the radio roost mostly in Miami for 51 years. He died last week at age 78.

I wonder if anyone still travels in a rickshaw anymore? 

Radio personality Rick Shaw who brought the Beatles sound to South Florida has died
 

     Thread Starter
 

Wed Sep 27 9:29 am  #15


Re: The Best Fake D.J. Name In Radio History

Can't forget Phil In and Geets Romo ( David Haydu). The name Geets Romo originated with the album "How to Speak Hip" by Del Close and John Brent.

Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys references that record in this session from 1966:


 

Last edited by Fitz (Wed Sep 27 9:31 am)


Cool Airchecks and More:
http://www.lettheuniverseanswer.com/
 

Wed Sep 27 1:38 pm  #16


Re: The Best Fake D.J. Name In Radio History

Um, Harry Caray.

Davester.